We use our own and third-party cookies to optimize your experience on this site, including to maintain user sessions. Without these cookies our site will not function well. If you continue browsing our site we take that to mean that you understand and accept how we use the cookies. If you wish to decline our cookies we will redirect you to Google.
Already have an account? Sign in.

 Remember Me | Forgot Your Password?
<<10111213141516171819>> Total results:933 References Per Page:

MNCs Try To Innovate To Meet Needs Of Rural Indians

May 7, 2010: 01:43 AM EST
Looking to make a market from Indian’s vast rural population, MNCs have been trying to innovate to create services suitable for people that often earn less than $2 a day. Companies have been studying villagers to gain insights into which services or products might take hold. Unilever achieved success with its low-cost sachets in the 1980s, but has struggled with later innovations. Phone companies are looking at new services geared to illiterate consumers in very rural areas, and Google is working on an online bulletin board for people that can’t read or use a computer. Despite the evident difficulties and high failure rates, MNCs are driven to persist in hopes they can establish themselves in this long-term growth market.
Eric Bellman, "Rural India Journal: What MNCs Do Right and Wrong in Rural India", Wall Street Journal, May 07, 2010, © Dow Jones & Company, Inc.
Domains
Innovation
Examples & Case Studies
Sectors
Personal Care
Geographies
Worldwide
Asia-Pacific
India

Roquette Introduces Pea Protein Product That Avoids Odor, Flavor Problems

May 4, 2010: 08:16 PM EST
French starch processing company Roquette says it has overcome a major drawback to the use of pea proteins in vegetable-derived products for high-protein dairy, dietary and sports food applications: odor and flavor. The company’s Nutralys S85F product, which is 85 percent pea protein, overcomes taste and odor problems, offering more neutral sensory notes than other pea proteins, thanks to a special technology. The company says the result is that more of the product can be used in food formulations. Nutralys is non-GMO, nutritious, easily digestible and comes from a reliable, traced source, the company says. Laboratoire PYC has developed a meal replacement recipe in which 100 percent of the milk protein usually used was replaced by Nutralys S85F. The result, according to Roquette, was “outstanding.”
"Roquette Succeeds in Optimising Pea Protein Product", Nutrition Horizon, May 04, 2010, © CNS Media BV
Domains
Innovation
Sectors
Food
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
EMEA
United States of America
Europe
France

European Scientists Making Progress In Search For Healthy, Tasty Gluten-Free Bread

May 5, 2010: 04:42 AM EST
Studies have determined that people genetically susceptible to celiac disease, caused by eating gluten and related proteins in wheat, barley or rye, experience an immune response that destroys absorptive cells on the surface of the small intestine. Scientists in Europe working on the Healthgrain project have been trying to develop gluten-free breads that are both nutritious and tasty. One focus of Healthgrain exploration has been lactic acid bacteria, which significantly improve the quality and shelf-life of gluten free breads. To deal with texture problems, scientists have tested enzymes to improve structure, though the enzymes showed different interactions with the various gluten free flours. The scientists also experimented with high pressure processing to create ingredients for gluten-free cereal products.
Prof. Elke Arendt, et al. , "New and improved gluten-free foods developed for patients with celiac disease", Healthgrain Project news release, May 05, 2010, via EurekAlert!, © VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland
Domains
Innovation
Sectors
Food
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe
Finland
Sweden
Ireland

Newly Identified Algae Strain May Lower Cholesterol, Inflammation And Blood Pressure

May 4, 2010: 09:23 PM EST
Researchers at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev in Israel have discovered a new microalgal strain, IKG-1, that can produce large amounts of a polyunsaturated fatty acid called DGLA (Dihomo-?-Linolenic Acid). The researchers believe IKG-1 can produce up to 15% (of dry weight) of DGLA, the only plant source that can produce such large amounts of the acid. DGLA is an Omega-6 fatty acid, although it only appears naturally as an intermediate in the biosynthesis of other compounds. If DGLA production can be commercialized it is possible that its use could help in lowering blood pressure, cholesterol and reducing heart attack risk.
Andrew Lavin, "Algae Strain Identified to Reduce Cholesterol, Blood Pressure and Inflammation ", American Associates, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev , May 04, 2010, © American Associates, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev
Domains
Innovation
Examples & Case Studies
Sectors
Food
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Middle East- Africa
Israel

Researchers Transform Fruit Processing Waste Into Antioxidant-Rich Powder

May 3, 2010: 09:30 PM EST
The skin and other by-products of processing fruit into packaged foods and juices are mostly used as animal feed or simply disposed of. But Australian researchers who analyzed the skins of tomatoes, apples, plums, peaches, and other fruits found them to be rich sources of antioxidants. Tomato waste, for example, has twice the amount of the red pigment lycopene. They then developed a process that involves heating, freezing and breaking up the waste with sound waves and concentrating it into a powder packed with antioxidants. Apple waste offers the most promise, they said, mainly because of the high levels of polyphenols. The researchers are working to refine their extraction methods, and are testing their concentrate as a thickener in fruit products and as an antioxidant booster in snack bars.
"From waste to health", The University of Melbourne Voice Vol. 6, No. 5 , May 03, 2010, © The University of Melbourne
Domains
Innovation
Sectors
Food
Geographies
Worldwide
Asia-Pacific
Australia

Individual Oral Health Needs Not Being Addressed By Families

May 4, 2010: 01:12 AM EST
A national online survey sponsored by GlaxoSmithKline polled more than a thousand mothers about the use of oral health care products in their households, finding that 69 percent believe that meeting the unique oral health care needs of each family member is very important. But almost half said they apply a “one size fits all” approach when buying oral care products. Not a good idea, says GlaxoSmithKline, because addressing individual oral health needs is very important. The company says it is launching an online resource for people looking for oral health education and personalized oral care plans. Visitors to WealthOfOralHealth.com who complete a survey will receive a customized plan for each family member that covers bad breath, cavities, acid erosion, and sensitive teeth.
"New survey shows families may not be addressing their oral health care needs", GlaxoSmithKline, May 04, 2010, © GlaxoSmithKline
Domains
Innovation
Sectors
Personal Care
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Confectioners Working To Meet Demands Of Health-Conscious Consumers With A Sweet Tooth

May 3, 2010: 10:37 PM EST
The global confectionery industry, now valued at more than $145 billion, is showing solid growth, thanks in part to the willingness of confectioners to meet the demands of health-conscious chocolate and candy lovers while testing new flavors and formulas. In fact, in a survey of confectionery makers, market researchers, chocolatiers, and nutritionists, an industry trade association found that the next big trend on the confectionery horizon will be products offering health benefits, "better-for-you" ingredients, reduced fat, sugar-free and other calorie- and portion-control treats. Suppliers to the industry, meanwhile, are reacting accordingly. Available ingredients include whole rather than refined functional ingredients that use more fiber and complex carbohydrates; corn products; hydrocolloids such as gelatin; pectins; almond-chocolate combos; and fruits, especially blueberries.
Diane Toops, News & Trends Editor, "Confectionery Makers Sweet Talking with Candy Innovation", Food Processing, May 03, 2010, © Food Processing
Domains
Innovation
Sectors
Food
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

First Lady Offers Plan For Reducing Childhood Obesity In One Generation

May 1, 2010: 09:25 PM EST
First Lady Michelle Obama has released an aggressive action plan on childhood obesity that calls for significant action by the federal government, states, schools, food and media companies and parents. The plan asks the federal government, for example, to provide more information on prenatal care and breastfeeding, a more comprehensible food pyramid, and improvements in nutritional choices for federally-supported school lunches. States should require child care providers to be better educated in nutrition. Schools should re-activate and maintain physical education programs, keep an eye on snack foods available to students, and replace cafeteria deep fryers with salad bars. Cities should make it easier for kids to play safely outdoors, fast food restaurants should cut sugar content of meals, and media should set nutrition standards for foods advertised to children.
"SOLVING THE PROBLEM OF CHILDHOOD OBESITY WITHIN A GENERATION", White House Task Force on Childhood Obesity - Report to the President, May 01, 2010, © U.S. Department of Health & Human Services
Domains
Innovation
Sectors
Beverages
Food
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Kraft And Coca-Cola Look To Next Generation Of Vending Machines

May 1, 2010: 10:38 PM EST
Kraft and Coca-Cola recently unveiled their latest vending machines at the National Automatic Merchandising Association show. This new generation are highly interactive, with touchscreen displays that highlight the products and allow users to view product information with a swipe of the hand or make the image flip around. The machines are scheduled to be released this winter.
Christopher Borrelli, "Kraft, Coke move to iVend", Chicago Tribune, May 01, 2010, © Chicago Tribune
Domains
Innovation
Sectors
Retail
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

High-Fructose Corn Syrup Faces An Uphill PR Battle

April 30, 2010: 09:47 PM EST
One by one, food manufacturers are giving in to public relations pressure and social media-based activism that has demonized high-fructose corn syrup. Hoping for a sales boost, they are replacing the HFCS with more expensive sugar and absorbing the increased cost, despite scientific evidence that sugar is really no better for you. U.S. sales of HFCS have fallen (nine percent in 2009) and the downhill slide is expected to continue. The trade association representing HFCS makers has spent millions for six years to defend corn syrup’s image, but so far to no avail: market research finds that 53 percent of Americans worry that HFCS may be harmful. That bodes ill for the corn refiners. According to one supermarket expert, the chances of reversing public sentiment are “exactly zero.”
MELANIE WARNER, "For Corn Syrup, the Sweet Talk Gets Harder", NY Times, April 30, 2010, © The New York Times Company
Domains
Innovation
Sectors
Beverages
Food
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Fermentation Science Continues To Produce Flavorful, Nutritious Products And Ingredients

April 27, 2010: 08:34 PM EST
The science of fermentation, including probiotics, not only impacts the culinary arts, but also nutrition and health. Fermented foods and ingredients – bread, wine, beer, cheese, etc. – offer their own flavorful and other sensory pleasures, of course. But adding the right microorganisms during the fermentation process also enhances the nutritional value of ordinary substances with micronutrients: polyphenols, for example, such as resveratrol and flavonoids, in wine. Awareness is growing that probiotics contribute to health in various ways. Scientific data support the health claims of various bacterial strains and probiotic products in areas like intestinal diseases, obesity, diabetes and other systemic disorders. But consumers and others need to understand that probiotic strains are not universally effective: one that relieves symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome may have no impact on another health problem.
Todd Runestad, "The Science of Fermentation", Natural Foods Merchandiser, April 27, 2010, © Penton Media, Inc.
Domains
Innovation
Sectors
Beverages
Food
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Skeptics Ponder Food Industry’s Commitment To Conquering Global Obesity

April 23, 2010: 11:53 PM EST
Though the food industry says it’s committed to reducing obesity and improving global health and nutrition, skeptics wonder about the depth of the commitment. “Big Food,” they say, is a major contributor to the world’s so-called “over-nutrition” problem, sometimes referred to as “eating too much junk food.” Can the food industry really be counted on to follow a course of action that might end up hurting its own sales and profitability? Experts argue that, despite some visionary executives and corporate cultures, there’s little evidence that Big Food is “becoming even a small part of the public health solution – rather than just a large part of the problem.” And relying on it to address the global obesity problem unilaterally is like basing global warming solutions on “the goodwill of the automobile industry.”
MARK BITTMAN, "Can Big Food Fight Fat?", New York Times, April 23, 2010, © The New York Times Company
Domains
Innovation
Sectors
Beverages
Food
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Probiotic And High-Fiber Foods Show Steady Growth Globally

April 22, 2010: 04:04 AM EST
Consumer interest in foods that claim to promote digestive health continues to rise globally, especially in Europe, Australia, Japan and the U.S., where sales and new product launches of high-fiber and probiotic dairy products have been strong, despite a weakened world economy, confusion among consumers about the availability and benefits of digestive health foods, and uncertainties surrounding the legal status of product claims in Europe. U.S. awareness of digestive health foods has grown steadily in the last five years, thanks to innovation in the dairy sector. Dannon’s Activia yogurt, for example, was repositioned as a digestion regulation product that uses the Bifidus actiregularis cultures. Innova Market Insights credits the success of the Activia brand for moving probiotics dairy products into the mainstream yogurt market.
"New Products for Gut Health Still Show Steady Growth", Nutraceuticals World, April 22, 2010, © Rodman Publishing
Domains
Innovation
Sectors
Beverages
Food
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
EMEA
Asia-Pacific
United States of America
Europe
Australia
Japan

US Firm Designs for Health Launches PerioBiotic, A Probiotic Toothpaste

April 20, 2010: 05:30 AM EST
US-based nutritional products provider Designs for Health, Inc., launched a new line of toothpaste that contains Dental-Lac, a dental hygiene probiotic that uses Lactobacillus paracasei to eliminate harmful microorganisms that cause tooth decay and gum disease. PerioBiotic doesn’t contain artificial sweeteners, food dye or preservatives, or Sodium Lauryl Sulfate, a compound suspected to cause canker sores. The company claims PerioBiotic it is safe to be swallowed as it’s fluoride-free.
"New Designs for Health Probiotic Toothpaste -- A Breakthrough in Oral Health", PR Web, April 20, 2010, © Vocus PRW Holdings, LLC
Domains
Innovation
Sectors
Personal Care
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Food Companies Replacing HFCS With Sugar, But Still Search For A Tasty Zero-Calorie Sweetener

April 19, 2010: 11:49 PM EST
Food companies are reformulating many of their products, especially soft drinks, with refined cane sugar, eliminating high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) to satisfy health-conscious consumers who believe that HFSC is the culprit behind the U.S. obesity epidemic. Though scientists say corn syrup is no more harmful than sugar, it’s the perception among consumers that counts. In the meantime, companies like PepsiCo continue their search for a zero-calorie natural sweetener that tastes as good as sugar or corn syrup. Someday, CEO Indra Nooyi, who plans to boost sales of PepsiCo’s non-junk food products from $10 billion to $30 billion over ten years, predicts, "There will be a zero-calorie sweetener breakthrough."
Greg Burns , "Food-makers weigh sugar vs. corn syrup", Chicago Tribune, April 19, 2010, © Chicago Tribune
Domains
Innovation
Sectors
Beverages
Food
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

UK's Premier Foods Introduces Heart-Friendly Bread, First Approved By Heart UK

April 19, 2010: 04:33 AM EST
The UK's largest food maker, Premier Foods, is to start selling a new bread line aimed at helping consumers manage their cholesterol levels. Its newest product, Hovis Hearty Oats, is the first bread to be baked with 50% wheat flour and 50% oats, which can help maintain normal cholesterol. It contains beta-glucan, an ingredient which, if consumed regularly can help maintain normal cholesterol levels. The bread is the first to be approved by heart-health campaigners Heart UK. Premier Foods said it wants to promote bread for breakfast in the UK, where health-conscious consumers prefer cereals. According to Heart UK, 65 percent of the UK population has high cholesterol levels.
"Premier launches heart-healthy Hovis", AFN, April 19, 2010, © Australian Food News
Domains
Innovation
Sectors
Food
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe
United Kingdom

Growing Health-Awareness and Innovation Drives Yogurt Market Growth

April 16, 2010: 03:42 AM EST
A new report by US-based Global Industry Analysts estimates the world market for yogurt will exceed $67 billion by 2015, driven by rising consumer interest in functional and healthy foods and innovation delivering low-sugar, low-fat, anti-cholesterol and digestion-aiding products. The report, Yoghurt: A Global Strategic Business Report, claims yogurt is an ideal medium to deliver beneficial ingredients and companies are competing hard to differentiate themselves, with growing use of organic and natural ingredients, fruits, probiotics, and supplements such as Omega-3 EPA/DHA. Suppliers are also experimenting with different formats, such as drinkables and frozen yogurts; in the first quarter of 2010 there were a number of new launches by large companies suggesting innovation is set to continue.
"Yoghurt's future as a functional food assured", Scientist Live, April 16, 2010, © Setform Limited
Domains
Innovation
Sectors
Food
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
EMEA
United States of America
Canada
Middle East- Africa
South Africa

Companies Need To Make A Healthy Society A Business Priority

April 13, 2010: 08:12 PM EST
Businesses should be paying close attention to the fact that health has emerged as a critical socioeconomic and personal issue that rivals concern for the environment. A recent study of 15,000 people in 11 countries found that protecting the public's health was as important as protecting the environment among nearly three-fourths of respondents. Scientific and technological breakthroughs have made it easier to protect and improve the nation’s health, but threats – aging, obesity, diabetes, heart disease, poor management of chronic diseases, bad behavioral choices – continue to reduce the quality of life, endanger economic development and put pressure on the sustainability of the planet. Some companies like General Electric have already begun to make health part of a “holistic strategy” that joins business outcomes with the common good.
Nancy Turett, "Health Is The Next Green For Business", Forbes.com, April 13, 2010, © Forbes.com LLC™
Domains
Innovation
Trends
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Whole Grain Flour From Maize Delivers Flavor, Texture, Healthy Ingredients, Company Says

April 14, 2010: 01:51 AM EST
Baking companies looking for a cost-effective way to enhance the whole grain and fiber content of low moisture baked goods while preserving taste and texture may want to take a look at Hi-maize from National Starch Food Innovation. The company says the new product derived from maize works especially well in low moisture baking applications such as muffins, waffles, pizza, pasta, biscuits, cakes, cereals, artisanal bread and gluten-free products. The whole grain produces a mild taste and yellow color, according to the company, and delivers the protein, fiber, vitamins and minerals desired by health-conscious consumers. The company says Hi-maize flour contains 25 percent fiber, at least three times that of existing allergen-free whole grain alternatives. Produced through traditional high amylose maize breeding, the flour is available in medium and coarse varieties.
"National Starch Lunches Hi-Maize Wholegrain in Europe", Nutrition Horizon, April 14, 2010, © CNS Media BV
Domains
Innovation
Sectors
Food
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Market For Low- And No-Sodium Foods, Beverages Surges

April 12, 2010: 02:16 AM EST
Low-sodium/salt and no sodium/salt foods and beverages have become a key 2010 food trend and a major segment of the food industry, representing $$22 billion, or three percent, of the total market, according to market research publisher Packaged Facts. The main reason for the trend is America’s consciousness of the healthy impact of cutting back on dietary salt (sodium chloride) and sodium and the increased availability of better tasting low-sodium/salt and no-sodium/salt products. The trend has spread beyond traditional niche markets (like over-55 adults) to health-conscious consumers. The movement has also caught the attention of foodservice operators, food manufacturers and retailers, many of whom now offer “low-sodium” shopping aisles. The key swaying factor for consumers? Palatability. The preferred strategy for manufacturers: gradual, rather than sudden, reduction of sodium content.
"Low- and No-Sodium Foods and Beverages Emerge as Major Culinary Trend", Marketwire, April 12, 2010, © Marketwire, Incorporated.
Domains
Innovation
Sectors
Beverages
Food
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

DuPont Introduces Fish-Free, Vegetarian Omega-3 Supplement In the US

April 8, 2010: 04:51 AM EST
Science-based products and services firm DuPont has introduced the first fish-free Omega-3 supplement in the US under the trademark New Harvest, a vegetarian alternative to fish-based Omega-3 fatty acids. New Harvest has high EPA content that is known to help sustain heart health and aid in keeping cholesterol levels healthy. DuPont has tapped market partner Futurebiotics to distribute New Harvest at select GNC stores. The company believes New Harvest will help Americans increase consumption of Omega-3 that is sourced mainly from fatty fish and nutritional supplements. A new survey indicated that just 10% of Americans eat sufficient fish every week while more than 80% do not consume supplements to meet the recommended intake for Omega-3 fatty acids.
"DuPont Launches New Vegetarian Source of Omega-3 Nutritional Supplements ", PR Web , April 08, 2010, © Vocus PRW Holdings, LLC
Domains
Innovation
Sectors
Food
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Nutritional Supplement Boosts Stem Cell Production In Clinical Study

April 7, 2010: 07:53 AM EST
A clinical study has found that a commercially-available nutritional supplement kindles the production of stem cells essential for tissue repair. Stem-Kine from Aidan Products increases the blood circulation of hematopoietic stem cells that generate all blood cells and endothelial progenitor cells that repair damage to blood vessels, researchers said. A team of researchers from industry and academia tested the supplement in 18 healthy adults between 20 and 72 years. They ingested the supplement twice a day for two weeks. Researchers tested their blood for stem cell activity and found that the supplement was increased the number of stem cells circulating in the blood. Stem-Kine is a mixture of green tea, astralagus, goji berry extracts, “good” bacteria Lactobacillus fermentum, antioxidant ellagic acid, immune enhancer beta 1,3 glucan and vitamin D3.
Nina A Mikirova, James A Jackson, Ron Hunninghake, Julian Kenyon, et al., "Nutraceutical augmentation of circulating endothelial progenitor cells and hematopoietic stem cells in human subjects", Journal of Translational Medicine, April 07, 2010, © Journal of Translational Medicine
Domains
Innovation
Sectors
Food
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Milk Fermented With Probiotics: A New Functional Food Therapy For Gastritis?

April 7, 2010: 09:31 AM EST
Scientists in Argentina have found in animal experiments that using milk fermented with a probiotic effectively treats aspirin-induced gastritis. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) are commonly used to reduce inflammation and pain associated with diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. Unfortunately, NSAIDs often cause gastritis in the stomach because they damage mucosal cells. The new research has found that milk fermented with the probiotic Streptococcus thermophilus CRL 1190 eases chronic gastritis by adjusting the immune response and by thickening the gastric mucus gel layer. The researchers concluded: “Fermented milk with S. thermophilus CRL 1190 … could be used in novel functional foods as an alternative natural therapy for chronic gastritis induced by acetylsalicylic acid.”
Cecilia Rodríguez, Marta Medici, Fernanda Mozzi and Graciela Font de Valdez, "Therapeutic effect of Streptococcus thermophilus CRL 1190-fermented milk on chronic gastritis", World Journal of Gastroenterology, April 07, 2010, © Baishideng
Domains
Innovation
Sectors
Food
Geographies
Worldwide
Latin America
Argentina

Baking Companies Look To Enhance Product Lines With Fiber, Ancient Grains

April 5, 2010: 11:35 PM EST
Baking companies have met increased consumer demand for nutritious baked goods by boosting fiber content, cutting calories, and replacing unhealthy fats with healthier ones, like omega-3s. But bakers are also moving in other apparently healthy directions, testing advanced forms of fiber, as well as nontraditional and “ancient” grains in products targeted at consumers who want to (or have to) avoid wheat and gluten, or who simply want to experiment with something new, different and healthy. Two fibers that are growing in popularity among bakers are inulin, a natural starch, and resistant starch, which avoids being digested and thus acts like fiber in the colon. As to ancient grains, bakers are toying with such unfamiliar flours as amaranth, millet, quinoa, sorghum and teff, offered individually and as custom blends.
Mark Anthony, "Food Processors Working to Produce Healthier Baked Goods", FoodProcessing.com, April 05, 2010, © Food Processing
Domains
Innovation
Sectors
Food
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Digestive Health Tops List Of Key Food, Nutrition, Health Trends Of 2010

April 1, 2010: 07:27 AM EST
The biggest trend in food, nutrition and health in 2010, and still a major growth opportunity globally in spite of the recession, is digestive health, as evidenced by notable growth rates of digestive health products, including premium brands, according to industry expert Julian Mellentin. Huge areas of unexploited market potential still exist, Mellentin says, especially for fiber fortified foods, as well as beverages and cereals. Also gathering momentum is the so-called “bones and movement” category: products that address bone and joint health among the growing over-40 population. Other key trends highlighted by Mellentin include: fruits and superfruits, antioxidants, weight management, healthy snacking, and packaging and “premiumisation.” Micro-trends include: protein power, kids’ nutrition, probiotics, omega-3 and the “ultra-niche opportunity” beauty.
"10 Key Trends in Food, Nutrition & Health 2010 ", just-food, April 01, 2010, © just-food.com
Domains
Innovation
Sectors
Beverages
Food
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Asia-Pacific
Europe
United Kingdom

Simple Test Developed To Detect Hazardous Food Contaminant Melamine

April 1, 2010: 09:51 AM EST
Melamine – an industrial compound used in plastics and fertilizers and found in 2008 in tainted dairy products from China – sickened thousands of people, especially children, leading to a global recall of Chinese dairy products. High in nitrogen, melamine was added to foods to make them appear higher in protein value during testing. To combat the problem, US researchers have developed a quick, cheap and simple way to detect melamine in milk. The new method uses gold nanoparticles and a dual color and precipitation test that takes less than 15 minutes, according to the researchers. The interaction between the gold nanoparticles and melamine causes a dramatic color change. The researchers hope to develop a simple commercial kit that can be used by anyone, anywhere to detect melamine in food.
Fang Wei, Robert Lam, Stacy Cheng, Steven Lu, Dean Ho, and Na Li, "Rapid Detection of Melamine in Whole Milk Mediated by Unmodified Gold Nanoparticles", Applied Physics Letters, April 01, 2010, © American Institute of Physics
Domains
Innovation
Sectors
Beverages
Food
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
Asia-Pacific
United States of America
China

Bakers Are Carefully Reformulating Products To Meet Demand For Whole Grains

April 1, 2010: 08:19 AM EST
Bakers are successfully meeting a major challenge leveled at them by health-conscious consumers: provide fiber-filled whole grain options that are also light and savory. So far the response has been built around substituting – albeit gradually – whole grains for white flour in products. The trend has expanded beyond breads to include whole grain croissants, crackers, bagels and pizza crust that have the appearance, texture and flavor that consumers are used to. The trick so far has been the use of specially processed “white wheat” that packs the range of vitamins, minerals, dietary fiber, etc., of whole wheat products but not the bitter whole meal taste. The key to successfully formulating whole grain baked goods? Remembering that whole grains absorb more water than white flour, but at a slower rate.
Jean Thilmany , "Going whole grain", Baking management, April 01, 2010, © Penton Media, Inc.
Domains
Innovation
Sectors
Food
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Food Scientists Making Progress In Quest To Enhance Fiber Content

March 25, 2010: 02:06 AM EST
With the market for dietary fiber expected to top $495 million by 2011, and growing annually by 14.2 percent thanks to government and nutritionist health recommendations, it’s no wonder many food companies are looking for ways to include or boost fiber in foods and beverages. The challenge for food processors is that available dietary fibers behave differently in food processing, depending on the chemistry of the fiber and the desired end product characteristics. Inulin, the most commonly used fiber today, is easy to work with, lacks noticeable taste or texture, and is extremely fiber-dense. But food formulators eager to hike fiber content face technical problems: how to pack more than five grams of fiber into a single serving? The answer: multi-fiber blends, which can nearly double fiber content while keeping mouthfeel and taste.
Kimberly J. Decker, "A New Look at Fiber Fortification", Food Product Design, March 25, 2010, © Virgo Publishing, LLC
Domains
Innovation
Sectors
Beverages
Food
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Can PepsiCo Transform Itself From Purveyor Of Salt, Fat And Sugar?

March 25, 2010: 03:38 AM EST
PepsiCo faces a three-front war: enhancing company financial performance, staying a step ahead of government agencies determined to “regulate” an end to the obesity epidemic, and holding onto the brand loyalty of customers who don’t care a fig about sugar, salt or fat content. To fend off the regulators, Pepsi has announced several long-term deadlines for cutting unhealthy ingredients. On the financial front, investors seem willing to look past the company’s lackluster 2009 performance, now that it has hiked the dividend, implemented a share buyback, taken steps toward cross-marketing snacks and beverages, and launched strategic marketing and supply partnerships. Nevertheless, it remains to be seen whether consumer, government and other skeptics will be able to swallow a marketing strategy that dwells somewhat equally on healthy and unhealthy products.
"Pepsi gets a makeover", The Economist print edition , March 25, 2010, © The Economist Newspaper Limited
Domains
Innovation
Sectors
Strategy
Beverages
Food
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

PepsiCo Set To Launch New Lay’s Chip Version Using Lower-Sodium Salt

March 22, 2010: 03:58 AM EST
With the U.S. food industry under increasing governmental and consumer pressure to lower sodium content in products, companies have been scrambling to find a technological solution that preserves flavor. PepsiCo Inc. apparently is leading this movement: it plans to launch a new version of Lay's potato chips with a lower-sodium salt. The new crystal structure of the salt – it’s more powdery – cuts the sodium content by 25 percent. Still in the testing phase, the salt could end up in other chip products, including seasoned versions, and in products like Cheetos and Quaker bars. Working closely with academic and company scientists in Europe and the U.S., PepsiCo found what it wanted – a salt that delivers a burst of salty flavor followed by a body of flavor and lingering sensation.
BETSY MCKAY , "PepsiCo Develops 'Designer Salt' to Chip Away at Sodium Intake", Wall Street Journal, March 22, 2010, © Dow Jones & Company, Inc.
Domains
Innovation
Sectors
Food
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Australian Cereal And Bread Makers Agree To Cut Salt Content

March 22, 2010: 03:59 AM EST
Leading Australian cereal and bread makers have agreed with the government to reduce salt content in their products gradually over the next three to four years. Participants in a “dialogue” convened by government health authorities and a group representing the food industry settled on a sodium target of 400 milligrams per 100 grams for ready to eat cereals, breads, rolls and buns. Cereal makers Kellogg’s, Sanitarium, etc., set a target date of 2014, while bread manufacturers George Weston Foods, Goodman Fielder Baking and others agreed on 2013. An official of the industry group noted that George Weston had already removed 342 tons of salt from products since 2009, despite technical challenges, and other food companies were looking to reduce salt in “processed meats, soups, sauces and snack foods.”
"AUS: Bread, cereal makers target reduced salt", Just-food, March 22, 2010, © just-food.com
Domains
Innovation
Sectors
Food
Geographies
Worldwide
Asia-Pacific
Australia

Food Industry Embraces Food Additives, Thanks To Scientific Advancements

March 22, 2010: 04:14 AM EST
The diversity and quantity of fortified food products have grown dramatically in the last five years, thanks to advancements in additive science that have solved problems like objectionable flavors and odors, and made formulation easier. Formulation now requires less effort thanks to new matrices. Spray drying, for example, produces a starch matrix that enhances the fat solubility of vitamins A,D, E and K in water- and juice-based foods. And lipid encapsulation has made possible better tasting, healthier meal-replacement bars. The trendiest additives in the last five years? Vitamins C and E, thanks to their recognized antioxidant – and possibly cancer-prevention – properties; biotin, which has become a common ingredient in hair and skin care products; and inulin, now regularly used in vitamin-mineral premixes to boost food fiber content.
Vanessa Teter, "Food Fortification Trends", Natural Products Insider, March 22, 2010, © Virgo Publishing, LLC
Domains
Innovation
Sectors
Beauty
Beverages
Food
Personal Care
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Natural Soups, 3-Ply Bath Tissue Top NRI’s Lists Of Successful ‘09 Product Launches

March 22, 2010: 10:47 PM EST
Despite an uncertain economy in which consumers paid very close attention to what ended up ion their shopping carts, many companies were able to successfully introduce new food and non-food products in 2009. Information Resources, Inc., kept track of them, compiling two top-ten lists ranked by sales. The biggest achiever in the food category was Campbell’s Prize Harvest line of “100 percent natural” soups, a marketing coup after the company finally figured out how to touch base with its primary demo. Filling out the top five winners in the food category were Bud Light Lime from Anheuser-Busch, Green Giant Valley Fresh Steamers, Arnold Select Sandwich Thins and Dreyer’s/Edy’s Fun Flavors ice cream. King of the hill in the non-food category? Georgia-Pacific’s Quilted Northern Ultra Plush, the first three-ply bath tissue introduced in the U.S. market.
Elaine Wong and Todd Wasserman, "IRI's Top Launches of 2009", Brandweek, March 22, 2010, © Brandweek
Domains
Innovation
Sectors
Food
Personal Care
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Carbery Unveils Food Ingredient That Blends WheyProtein And Omega-3

March 22, 2010: 02:55 AM EST
After what it called “extensive development work,” Irish ingredients supplier Carbery has introduced a product combining whey protein concentrate (WPC) and omega-3 fatty acids with “good mouthfeel and texture.” The ingredient provides levels of EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid), DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) and ALA (alpha-linoleic acid) that make foods eligible to use “source of” and “high in” omega-3 label claims in compliance with revised European Union regulations. The new ingredient -- part of Carbery’s Carbelec product line containing whey concentrates with up to 80 percent protein -- targets the meal replacement, clinical nutrition and low calorie diet markets, where “consumers need an easy way to meet daily nutritional guidelines and support health,” a Carbery executive said. Israeli researchers were the first to discover that whey protein could be a nano-vehicle for delivering DHA.
Shane Starling, "Carbery Launches Whey-Omega-3 Blend", American Dairy Products Institute, March 22, 2010, © American Dairy Products Institute
Domains
Innovation
Sectors
Food
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
EMEA
United States of America
Europe
Middle East- Africa
United Kingdom
Ireland
Israel

7-Eleven U.S. To Develop Low-Priced Foods For Hispanic Market

March 22, 2010: 03:54 AM EST
The U.S.-based unit of 7-Eleven is once again attempting to take advantage of economies of scale by linking up with its Mexican counterpart to create lower-priced private label foods targeting Hispanic customers. The company hopes the partnership will create enough purchasing clout to reduce costs and, in turn, prices. "It is important to get the best cost possible and offer the customer the best price," a 7-Eleven spokeswoman said. Partnerships that exploit economies of scale to create cost-saving opportunities are not new to the U.S. unit of 7-Eleven. Last year it pooled resources with its Tokyo-based parent company to market two new low-price wines.
"7-Eleven Develops Private Label Products for Hispanics ", Convenience Store News, March 22, 2010, © Nielsen Business Media, Inc.
Domains
Innovation
Sectors
Food
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
Asia-Pacific
United States of America
Mexico
Japan

Microscopic Crystals Help UK’s Bakers Cut Salt Content, But Not Product Quality

March 22, 2010: 02:47 AM EST
The UK’s top baking companies are getting ready to launch new products with sodium levels slashed by as much as half – from 1.8 percent to .7 percent – thanks to microscopic salt crystals that have no impact on volume, texture or weight. Emanate, the company providing the tiny crystals, says the technology is based on the principle that the smaller the salt crystal, the greater the perception of salt, so less is needed. The company overcame technical hurdles – simply grinding the salt finer didn’t work because the crystals stick together – using an innovative process that alters crystal structure. Crystals become free-flowing hollow balls with a shelf-life of 18 months, an Emanate exec said. Bakers are satisfied with the result: new products, albeit more expensive, could hit store shelves in early 2011.
Elaine Watson, "Bakers slash salt with ‘micro’ salt particles", Food Manufacture, March 22, 2010, © William Reed Business Media Ltd
Domains
Innovation
Sectors
Food
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe
United Kingdom

Emerging Nutricosmetics Industry Moving Forward With Superfruit-Based Skin Care Formulas

March 22, 2010: 04:07 AM EST
The successful use of so-called superfruits in natural products has caught the attention of the personal care and beauty industries, where the phenomenon is known as “nutricosmetics” or “beauty from within.” Anti-aging and beauty products that are ingested rather than topically applied increasingly include superfruit-derived ingredients, whose benefits are supported by scientific research. One company, for example (derma e), is using formulas based on: pomegranates to help prevent wrinkling and reduce free radical damage; grape seed oils to improve sun-aged skin; and cranberry oils to fight free radicals and hydrate skin. An industry executive cautioned, however, that companies need to hold superfruit-based products to the same high quality standards as other personal care products: including “sustainable harvesting, identifiable and researched phytochemical profile testing, and quality assurance compliance.”
Alissa Marrapodi , "Beauty Fruits—Superfruits for Skin Care", Inside Cosmeceuticals, March 22, 2010, © Virgo Publishing, LLC
Domains
Innovation
Sectors
Beauty
Beverages
Food
Personal Care
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Common Food Ingredient From The Sea Acts As Super Dietary Fat-Absorber

March 22, 2010: 03:38 AM EST
A team of scientists at Newcastle University (UK) has found in lab experiments that a natural dietary fiber known as alginate (found in seaweed) can prevent absorption of fat better than most anti-obesity products currently on the market. Using an artificial gut to test the performance of more than 60 natural fibers, the researchers measured fat digested and absorbed, finding that the kelp fiber absorbed as much as 75 percent of fat. The food industry already uses small amounts of alginates in foods as thickeners and stabilizers. But the research team wants to find out whether adding seaweed fiber to foods like bread will actually promote weight loss while eating. An early encouraging result: a blind taste test found that alginate-based bread had better texture and richness than standard white bread.
"Seaweed to tackle rising tide of obesity", Newcastle University, March 22, 2010, © Newcastle University
Domains
Innovation
Sectors
Food
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe
United Kingdom

Natural & Organic Products Europe Show Set For April 11-12

March 22, 2010: 03:15 AM EST
More than 500 European manufacturers and suppliers of functional foods will be showcasing new products, brand improvements, and redesigned packaging at the Natural & Organic Products Europe show from April 11-12 at London’s Olympia. According to show organizers, a wide variety of innovative natural and organic products will be featured during the free two-day event. Among the expected highlights: a new concentrated organic beetroot stamina shot from James White Drinks; a homegrown, all natural chewing gum made with Black Mitcham peppermint from Peppersmith; artichoke tea from Natur Boutique; new organic and natural snacks from Infinity Foods; and Glee Gum, an all-natural, gluten-free chewing gum from Natural & Organic Products Europe. Registration information can be found at www.naturalproducts.co.
"Functional Foods - Trade show highlights at Natural & Organic Products Europe 2010", CisionWire, March 22, 2010, © Cision
Domains
Innovation
Sectors
Beverages
Food
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe
United Kingdom

Yakult Danone India Expands Door-To-Door Distribution Model To Mumbai

March 20, 2010: 04:22 AM EST
After successful testing in four Indian cities, probiotics health foods maker Yakult Danone India Ltd. has extended its global door-to-door distribution program known as the Yakult Ladies system to Mumbai and Pune. Yakult is a probiotic drink that contains bacteria (Lactobacillus casei strain Shirota) that purportedly benefit the digestive system. Under the distribution program, young women specially trained for door-to-door distribution deliver probiotic products to customer homes. They also educate customers in the health benefits of probiotics and provide free samples. The company’s marketing test involved 140 trained women in Delhi, NCR, Jaipur and Chandigarh. With the addition of Pune and Mumbai, that number is expected to more than double by the end of the year. According to the company, there are 80,000 Yakult Ladies around the world.
"Yakult Danone India (P) Ltd. introduces its global distribution system ‘YAKULT LADIES SYSTEM’ in Mumbai ", Web Newswire, March 20, 2010, © Webnewswire
Domains
Innovation
Sectors
Beverages
Geographies
Worldwide
Asia-Pacific
India

Nano-Delivery Of Coconut Oil Compound Could Be Safer Acne Treatment

March 17, 2010: 09:59 AM EST
Lauric acid, found in both coconut oil and human breast milk, shows potential as a safer treatment for acne when carried by tiny "nano-bombs" to skin bacteria sites, new US research shows. The natural substance has a side benefit: it avoids the objectionable side effects like burning and inflammation of current acne treatments. Researchers developed a nano-scale delivery system that carries tiny lauric-acid-filled bubbles straight to acne-causing bacteria in the skin. Gold nanoparticles attached to the surfaces of the lauric-acid-filled nano-bombs (liposomes) prevent them from fusing and point them toward the acne-causing bacteria. When the liposomes reach the bacterial membranes, the gold nanoparticles drop off, freeing the liposomes to do their deadly work. Next step? "These nano-bombs are likely to be tested on humans in the near future," a researcher says.
Dissaya Pornpattananangkul, Sage Olson, Santosh Aryal, et al., "Stimuli-Responsive Liposome Fusion Mediated by Gold Nanoparticles", ACS Nano, March 17, 2010, © American Chemical Society
Domains
Innovation
Sectors
Beauty
Food
Personal Care
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Cloves Seen As Potential Source Of Natural Antioxidant For The Food Industry

March 16, 2010: 01:24 AM EST
The shelf life of some foods, especially meats, is limited by lipid (fat) oxidation, which causes deterioration and loss of nutritional value and flavor. To combat this problem, the food industry has been using synthetic antioxidants, whose side effects cause “several undesirable disorders,” according to a study by Spanish scientists. The goal of their research was to find natural spice oil antioxidants that can be incorporated into food products to retard spoilage. Testing several spices associated with the Mediterranean diet, the researchers found that essential oils from cloves have the highest amounts of phenols, and worked the best at preventing oxidative activity. Other spices tested were oregano, thyme, rosemary, and sage, each of which exhibited at least some antioxidant properties.
Manuel Viuda-Martos, Yolanda Ruiz Navajas, et al. , "Antioxidant activity of essential oils of five spice plants widely used in a Mediterranean diet", Flavour and Fragrance Journal, March 16, 2010, © John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
Domains
Innovation
Sectors
Food
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe
Spain

Michelle Obama Asks Food Industry Cooperation In War Against Childhood Obesity

March 16, 2010: 02:06 AM EST
First Lady Michelle Obama recently carried the war on childhood obesity to a meeting of grocery industry executives, emphasizing that their cooperation is needed to win that war in the U.S. It’s not about simply marketing foods targeted at children as healthy, she said, but actually making the foods healthy. Rates of childhood obesity have tripled in the last thirty years, she noted, and the responsibility to reverse that trend lies with parents, teachers and government officials, and especially with the food industry. Although she acknowledged advances made by several companies, Obama urged greater efforts, especially in the advertising arena, where food industry marketing knowledge is especially sophisticated. “I'm here today to ask you to use that knowledge and that power to our kids' advantage," she said.
Jane Black , "First lady asks foodmakers to be on front line tackling childhood obesity", Washington Post, March 16, 2010, © The Washington Post
Domains
Innovation
Sectors
Beverages
Food
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

A Few Top Food And Beverage Brands Quietly Shift From HFCS To Sugar

March 15, 2010: 02:25 AM EST
Thanks to a growing consumer preference for natural ingredients – and a narrowing gap in the prices of once-cheap high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) and sugar – leading brands Hunt’s ketchup, Gatorade, Wheat Thins and short-term “throwback” versions of Pepsi and Mountain Dew are now sweetened with sugar instead of HFCS. But marketers wary of alarming loyal buyers of corn syrup-based products are soft-pedaling the change. Gatorade plans a quiet campaign advising moms and others about the health risks of corn syrup. Wheat Thins vaunts “the benefits of whole grains,” and sugar-sweetened Hunt’s ketchup quietly joins a reduced sugar and organic “lifestyle range” of products. Meanwhile, as the HFCS industry battles bad press about corn syrup, the threat of state and federal taxation looms over all sugary products.
Natalie Zmuda , "Major Brands No Longer Sweet on High-Fructose Corn Syrup", AdAge, March 15, 2010, © Crain Communications
Domains
Innovation
Sectors
Beverages
Food
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Functional Food Companies Can Benefit From The Emerging Personal ROI Trend

March 15, 2010: 10:56 AM EST
Growing insistence on extracting more emotional and social value from purchases – a “personal return on investment” – means that consumers these days are concerned about more than product cost and functionality. They are also concerned about fair trade, resource management and corporate social responsibility. Functional food producers should take note, because health-conscious consumers are not only increasingly aware of the cost and nutritional value of functional foods they purchase. They are also aware of environmental and social issues, and concerned about the social responsibility levels of companies they deal with. Are they, for example, committed to the principles of fair trade? According to Maryellen Molneaux, “opportunities exist for marketers of functional foods and beverages” who “promote value differential” and can help consumers increase their personal ROI.
Maryellen Molyneaux, "Personal ROI on Functional Foods", Food Product Design, March 15, 2010, © Virgo Publishing, LLC
Domains
Innovation
Sectors
Trends
Beverages
Food
Geographies
Worldwide
North America

PepsiCo Tests Greener Fertilizers To Reduce Tropicana’s Carbon Footprint

March 11, 2010: 03:14 AM EST
Concerned about the fairly large carbon footprint – thanks to nitrogen-based fertilizers – of its Tropicana orange juice, PepsiCo has contracted with two companies to develop greener plant foods. So far, they have come up with two possibilities that are being tested at one of PepsiCo’s Florida orange farms. Each reduces the need for natural gas during production. One, based on calcium, gets rid of nitrous oxide emissions entirely. The other is based on locally-sourced organic, renewable, emission-reducing raw materials like biofuels. PepsiCo will conduct a long-term study of the two green fertilizers to make sure crop yield isn’t hurt over the long run. If successful, and if PepsiCo implements the new fertilizers systemwide, they “could have a major impact on U.S. farming and the corporation itself.”
Bryan Walsh , "Tropicana: Trying to Make a Greener Orange Juice", Time.com, March 11, 2010, © Time Inc
Domains
Innovation
Sectors
Beverages
Food
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Some Multinationals Are Succeeding In Tough Rural Indonesian Consumer Market

March 11, 2010: 04:18 AM EST
International consumer goods companies have chalked up some sales successes in Indonesia’s urban market, but in the rural areas, which offer huge potential, multinationals have run up against a perplexing problem. Some fast moving consumer goods (FMCG) companies like Unilever and Kraft have had success, but in general multinational brands have found the going tough in the countryside. Roadblocks for multinationals include the presence of entrenched local competition, as well as steep import levies and distribution costs that affect prices. On a deeper level, multinationals are hamstrung by a dearth of rural marketing information. But for those who have persisted, there have been notable successes: a McDonald’s fried chicken and rice dish, a Marlboro clove cigarette, and a Kraft biscuit brand with extra calcium and vitamins targeted at low-income consumers.
Asiya Bakht, "Indonesia: Brands seek a slice of the lucrative rural market", Media, March 11, 2010, © Haymarket Media Limited
Domains
Innovation
Sectors
Beverages
Food
Geographies
Worldwide
Asia-Pacific
Indonesia

Big Head Start Plus State Subsidies Drive Organic Farming Growth In Czech Republic

March 10, 2010: 02:43 AM EST
Despite problems like government red tape and higher production costs, organic farming and processing in the Czech Republic are growing steadily enough to be deemed a substantial success. The number of organic farms hit 2,689 in 2009, accounting for 400,000 hectares, or 9.38 percent of total farmland, according to industry researcher Bioinstitut. The country’s organic agriculture track record going back to 1980 gave it a head start over other EU states, of course, but a doubling of government subsidies between 2006 and 2008 was the major shot in the arm. And organic farmers have reason to be optimistic about their economic future: most supermarkets in Prague, for example, carry organic products. A side benefit: innovative farming methods are teaching lessons that could have a long-term environmental impact on the country.
Philip Heijman , "Organic farmers seeing growth", Prague Post, March 10, 2010, © Prague Post, spol. s.r.o
Domains
Innovation
Sectors
Food
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe
Czech Republic

Neurology Expert Offers “Sound” Advice To Advertisers

March 10, 2010: 11:57 PM EST
According to neurology authority Martin Lindstrom, advertisers who ignore the powerful impact of familiar sounds – laughing babies, sizzling steaks, vibrating cell phones – on the human mind are missing a big opportunity. Lindstrom, author of the bestseller Buyology, found significant resonance among volunteers whose responses to those everyday sounds were carefully measured. The volunteers also responded to sounds associated with popular brands, including Intel, McDonald's and Home Depot. Lindstrom wrote in Fast Company that the sounds push a button in consumers’ minds, activating responses such as joy or hunger. A practical application? Playing recognizable sounds like percolating coffee, for example, in a grocery store breakfast food aisle. Once marketers become aware of “the power of sound,” Lindstrom wrote, “it will be used to increase brand recognition in increasingly sophisticated ways."
Tom Ryan , "The Power of Everyday Sounds", Retailwire, March 10, 2010, © RetailWire LLC
Domains
Innovation
Sectors
Beauty
Beverages
Food
Household Care
Personal Care
Retail
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Provider Of Healthy Vending Machine Snacks Says Science Supports Its Successful Strategy

March 9, 2010: 02:38 AM EST
YoNaturals, a San Diego-based provider of more than 600 healthier vending machine snacks to schools, hospitals, health clubs, etc., says recent scientific findings support its strategy. School-age kids snacking on "salty, fatty and sugary treats" are consuming "empty calories" that cause weight gains that portend adult health problems such as obesity, according to two studies. The company, whose snack line contains less fat, salt and sugar than the usual fare offered in schools, says vending machine owner-operators, attracted by the stability of the vending machine business, are increasingly aware of the healthy snack trend as well. That fact, coupled with a careful machine placement strategy, has fueled YoNaturals’ “explosive growth” beyond the West Coast, the company says.
"YoNaturals Calls for Healthier Snack Vending in Nation's Schools", Yahoo!, March 09, 2010, © Yahoo!
Domains
Innovation
Sectors
Food
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America
<<10111213141516171819>> Total results:933 References Per Page:
>> <<
Developed by Yuri Ingultsov Software Lab.